Drug Abuse Statistics in Austin

Austin Drug Abuse
Travis County, home to the city of Austin, experienced over 2,500 people being admitted for substance abuse treatment in 2002. Of those admitted, the nearly half were admitted for alcohol abuse, and the other half was admitted for other types of drugs. For every drug except those classified as “downers” and “other opiates” males dominated the population. Interestingly enough, more than 75% of patients were not married and had were not employed.

Substance-Related Arrests
While most of the residents in Austin do not abuse drugs, there are still a large number of people who do abuse them, as shown above. However, the statistics above only include those admitted for treatment and does not fully paint the picture of drug abuse in Austin. Taking a look at the number of substance-related arrests, for example, one can see another side of the drug world. In 2004, there were 3,681 drug possession arrests and 412 drug trafficking arrests. This includes all illegal hard drugs, including cocaine, heroin, and club drugs (ecstasy).

Heroin Abuse
Unfortunately, heroin is common on the streets on Austin. In 2002, for instance, the number of people admitted for marijuana abuse was only 2/3 that of the number of people admitted for heroin. The May 2007 edition of the Drug Policy Information Clearinghouse released by the Office of National Drug Control Policy stated about heroin:

In Austin, shooting galleries in the Montopolis area are reported to have disappeared as long-term users have either died, are in prison or have moved out of the area to avoid harassment from the police. Despite this, heroin is plentiful in the Montopolis area and three to four balloons of good quality heroin sell for $25 or less. Additional intelligence indicates that both black tar and Mexican brown heroin sell for $1,400­ $1,600/ounce in Austin.

While heroin is mostly injected into the body through needles, in the past year there has been an increase in the amount of heroin that is being snorted in powder form. The younger demographic is the cause of the snorting because they think they will not become addicted, but this a false belief and they eventually end up abusing the drug.

Drug Abuse Statistics – Trends in the New Generation

Monitoring the drug abuse statistics in our youth is a great indicator of the future of the next generations. Organizations such as Monitoring The Future (MTF) have been conducting research since the mid 1970s on the use of drugs amongst 12th grade students and their perception of drugs and its use. The University of Michigan’s Institute of Social Research conducts the studies.

The study is longitudinal and follows the patterns and changes in attitudes of the students over time. In 1991, the studies included 8th and 10th graders too.

The latest drug abuse statistics conducted by MTF were taken in 2008. The key findings showed a decrease in the abuse pattern for a majority of the drugs compared to the previous year.

There were a few positive results that were highlighted. In 2008, the number of 10th graders that have used any illicit drugs in their lifetime had significantly declined in comparison to 2007.

The percentage of youngsters in this age group that smoke cigarettes have continued to decline over the years, and has fallen to the lowest rate in the history of the survey. This is a promising finding, as the use of tobacco is one of the major concerns in health problems.

The use of any stimulant such as amphetamines and crystal methamphetamine is in continuing decline. The use of crack cocaine amongst 12th graders declined from 2008 to 2007.

Overall, the use of alcohol has also decreased amongst all the mentioned age groups in the last year. The 10the graders display a significant decline in the usage of alcohol.

However, there are also areas of concern that have been highlighted by the drug abuse statistics. Even though the use of marijuana has declined over the years, it appears to have reached a plateau with as much as 32.4 per cent of 12th graders using it regularly. The statistics for the use of prescriptive drugs without a medical prescription is also cause for concern with 15.4 per cent of 12th graders having done so in the past year. The perception of risk of harm associated with the use of LSD is also in continual decline. Next: Follow the links below to read more on the topics of drug addiction and abuse.

The American Heartland’s Declining Drug Abuse

Iowa with its rolling hills of fertile black dirt producing acre after acre of prairie grass, corn and a host of other products consumed by the rest of America has something to be proud these days. Regrettably these same farmlands were a hotbed of clandestine meth lab activity just a few years ago. Now, Iowa, The American Heartland, has something to be proud of when it comes to drug abuse statistics.

Iowa has long been known for its struggles with methamphetamine. In 2005 methamphetamine abuse and addiction were running rampant with wild abandon. Meth lab incidents reached staggering amounts totaling 1437 that year but things have since changed dramatically. Since the enactment of the Federal Combating Methamphetamine Epidemic Act (CMEA) and similar state laws to control the sale of pseudoephedrine (PSE) went into action meth lab incidents in Iowa plummeted to just 181 in 2007. 181 meth labs are still far too many but you have to admit the impressive improvement.

Obviously very creative drug abusers, dealers and meth “cooks” will find new ways of obtaining the key ingredient and in 2007 a new method called “smurfing” came into play. As a result from 2007-2009 meth lab incidents jumped 48%. Still yet Iowa’s meth related incidents remain relatively low in comparison to just a few years ago. Nationwide meth lab incidents increased 76% during that same two-year period.

Overall Iowa’s decreasing drug abuse statistics stand out from the rest of the country. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) 8.02 % of American citizens abused an illicit drug in the past 30 days. This same report indicates just 4.08% of Iowa residents participated in past month drug abuse. Abuse of illicit drugs other than marijuana is also lower in Iowa as 1.81% of Iowa citizens are reported to have participated compared to the national average of 3.58%.

Prescription drug addiction is a major concern in the United States. To help combat the problem the Iowa Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PMP) went into effect in 2009. The new system enables physicians and pharmacists to access vital information concerning patient’s abuse and drug diversion of these controlled substances.

Iowa still has others areas of concern with marijuana being most widely abused drug and accounting for 7273 (26%) of the overall treatment admissions in 2009. Still yet these numbers compared to other states and the rest of the country as a whole are something to be proud of.