Alarming Drug Abuse Statistics

As we are all aware, doping activity has really picked up pace since it has gotten the media and celebrities involved. This has become a major reason to worry for almost every parent. Among the most vulnerable class are teenagers, who are trying to fit in and be cool.. They are following in the footsteps of all these pop stars who have used drugs. Second on the list are people who are unemployed or are emotionally disturbed, they tend to drift towards these activities. Despite strict laws there has been no stopping for a lot of people.

The facts and figures speak for themselves. Among the age group of 12-17 the most popular drug is marijuana because it is cheap, available, and gives a good kick. Next in the list is cocaine, it is a popular party drug. Pain relievers are the next most popular after cocaine, it acts as a stress buster for many people. A lot of drugs are comparatively less consumed because of financial issues. Another interesting figure was that among adults aged 18 or older who first tried marijuana at age 14 or younger, 12.9 percent were classified with illicit drug dependence or abuse, higher than the 2.2 percent of adults, who had first used marijuana at age 18 or older.

Among adults, the age they first used alcohol was associated with their dependence on or abuse of alcohol. For example, among adults age 18 or older who first tried alcohol at age 14 or younger, 17.5 percent were classified with alcohol dependence or abuse, compared with only 3.7 percent of adults who had first used alcohol at age 18 or older. Adults age 21 or older who had first used alcohol before age 21 were more likely than adults who had their first drink at age 21 or older to be classified with alcohol dependence or abuse.

The rate of illicit drug dependence or abuse among males age 12 or older was similar, 3.7 percent. The rate for females involved in these activities is 2.1%. Adults age 18 or older who were on parole or a supervised release from prison during the past year had higher rates of dependence on or abuse of a substance (36.9 percent) than their counterparts who were not on parole or supervised release during the past year (9.1 percent). Probation status was associated with substance dependence or abuse. The rate of substance dependence or abuse was 39.7 percent among adults who were on probation, which was significantly higher than the rate among adults who were not on probation (8.7 percent).

The figures are also not too convincing for adults, 11.3 % people above the age 18 or older were found involved in these acts, 18.6% people from the age group of 20-25, 12.5% were from 26-49, 7.1% from 50- older. The prime reason among adults drifting toward drugs was too much stress and emotion disturbance. Another interesting figure was that 27.7 % of the people involved in illicit drug habits,29.7% were found out to be chain smokers and 38.6% were found out to be involved in severe drinking habits.

It’s really depressing to see such figures. I hope people realize these things and at least make an effort to save their health and make a better tomorrow for themselves. If such acts continue at the same pace as they are, I wonder what will be of the generations to come.

The American Heartland’s Declining Drug Abuse

Iowa with its rolling hills of fertile black dirt producing acre after acre of prairie grass, corn and a host of other products consumed by the rest of America has something to be proud these days. Regrettably these same farmlands were a hotbed of clandestine meth lab activity just a few years ago. Now, Iowa, The American Heartland, has something to be proud of when it comes to drug abuse statistics.

Iowa has long been known for its struggles with methamphetamine. In 2005 methamphetamine abuse and addiction were running rampant with wild abandon. Meth lab incidents reached staggering amounts totaling 1437 that year but things have since changed dramatically. Since the enactment of the Federal Combating Methamphetamine Epidemic Act (CMEA) and similar state laws to control the sale of pseudoephedrine (PSE) went into action meth lab incidents in Iowa plummeted to just 181 in 2007. 181 meth labs are still far too many but you have to admit the impressive improvement.

Obviously very creative drug abusers, dealers and meth “cooks” will find new ways of obtaining the key ingredient and in 2007 a new method called “smurfing” came into play. As a result from 2007-2009 meth lab incidents jumped 48%. Still yet Iowa’s meth related incidents remain relatively low in comparison to just a few years ago. Nationwide meth lab incidents increased 76% during that same two-year period.

Overall Iowa’s decreasing drug abuse statistics stand out from the rest of the country. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) 8.02 % of American citizens abused an illicit drug in the past 30 days. This same report indicates just 4.08% of Iowa residents participated in past month drug abuse. Abuse of illicit drugs other than marijuana is also lower in Iowa as 1.81% of Iowa citizens are reported to have participated compared to the national average of 3.58%.

Prescription drug addiction is a major concern in the United States. To help combat the problem the Iowa Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PMP) went into effect in 2009. The new system enables physicians and pharmacists to access vital information concerning patient’s abuse and drug diversion of these controlled substances.

Iowa still has others areas of concern with marijuana being most widely abused drug and accounting for 7273 (26%) of the overall treatment admissions in 2009. Still yet these numbers compared to other states and the rest of the country as a whole are something to be proud of.

Washington State Drug Abuse Statistics

Washington Drug Addiction

In 2007, approximately 38,000 people entered some form of substance abuse treatment in Washington State. Approximately 32,000 people of the people admitted were admitted for some sort of drug abuse. Many drugs have a significant presence in Washington state. Heroin, cocaine, and marijuana have long been major drugs, and all three of these have a strong presence in Washington. Meth is the relative newcomer, growing rapidly since it first began getting popular in the 1980s and 1990s. This article will not cover marijuana as it tends to be a much different issue than more destructive addictions such as heroin, cocaine, and meth addiction.

Heroin Addiction in Washington

Heroin abuse is a problem in Washington, but perhaps not as big a one as other parts of the nation. 2,495 people were admitted for heroin use in the state of Washington, making up ~6.5% of people admitted for substance abuse well below the national average of 13.6%. Heroin abuse is not concentrated in one particular area of Washington and is abused throughout the state.

Cocaine Addiction in Washington

2,163 people (5.7% of those admitted ) were admitted for smoking crack and another 763 (3.6%) went into treatment for snorting cocaine. Compared with the national averages of 9.4% and 3.7% this puts Washington’s cocaine abuse below the national average. However, cocaine is still available throughout Washington and is usually smuggled into Washington from Mexico, through California. Within Washington, crack cocaine is most commonly used in lower income urban areas while snorted cocaine is consumed by a more middle-class demographics.

Meth Addiction in Washington

In the state of Washington, meth / methamphetamine use is well above national averages. 6,378 people (16.7%) were admitted into facilities for amphetamine abuse, over twice the national average of 7.7%. Amphetamine abuse is still not as common in Washington as neighboring Oregon or California, but it is a relatively large problem within the state. Interestingly, since 2003 meth lab incidents in Washington have declined from 1,018 in 2003 to 122 in 2007. This indicates law enforcement’s crackdown on domestic meth labs. As local meth labs have been shut down, most of the drugs have been supplied by meth traffickers from Mexico. Meth also tends to be less of an urban drug, with most of the meth userbase located outside of major cities.